Sexual Chemistry

Sexual Chemistry is more than physical attraction based on body types, hair color, job description and personality. A woman’s all-over Cassolette, which is a combination of hair, skin and scent, is the basics of our pheromone attraction.


These invisible, airborne molecules influence one’s emotions and sexual behavior and act as sex signals to attract the opposite sex.

Scientific research shows that pheromones are a chemical reaction between two people who pick up each others sexual energy.

Woman’s scent peaks once a month during ovulation.

It is at this time that she most craves sex. Usually her desire to cheat on her partner increases while she’s ovulating.

In an evolutionary sense, she wants to find the best possible genes for her offspring.

We can learn a lot about a potential partner’s immune system from their odor.

Although not a conscious understanding, our subconscious can tell us a lot about an important immune system control area on our genome called the Major Histocompatibility Complex or (MHC).

When viewed through the lens of evolution, this makes perfect sense.

At this time, women tend to take better care with their appearance, becoming more attracted to stereotypically masculine features (wide shoulders, square jaws, etc.) and prefer dissimilar male MHC scents.

Pheromones that complement each other are the basis for producing healthy children.

During ovulation, when women are most likely to get pregnant, their bodies are tuned to be most receptive to the signs of potential mates - sexy faces, shapely bodies and alluring odors.

Like pieces in an evolutionary jigsaw puzzle, our sense of smell leads us to our complementary gene pool, filling in where necessary, and away from those who are too much like our own.

Opposites attract. People prefer the smell of a potential mate whose MHC is different from their own.




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This also means that there is no single 'irresistible' male scent, because a major part of what a woman finds attractive in a man's body odor depends on what kind of genes she herself has.

This makes good evolutionary sense.

Studies have shown that children born to couples who have dissimilar immune systems have genetically diverse MHC regions and are therefore more resistant to a greater number of diseases.

To the conscious nose, all you know is that this person smells really good.

Even their sweaty clothes have a heavenly scent--practically ambrosia.






The best way to keep your sexual chemistry pure is to refrain from taking birth control pills, which disrupt her natural cycles and reverse her preferences for MHC odors, making her attracted to immune systems similar to her own.

Scent attraction is so powerful, yet misunderstood, and because of that, disregarded for its impact in our allure to each other.

We assume that because we are evolved intellectually, that scent is unimportant in finding a mate.

And yet, the silent language of attraction are sex codes that will determine who finds your spark.

It is understanding your body’s reactions on a subconscious level and making conscious decisions based on subconscious yearnings.

Where men can enjoy having casual sex without sexual chemistry, women usually will not.

Thousands of women polled at pleasure parties were asked how important scent was in finding a lover.

Ninety nine percent that if his scent was not pleasing, they would not be attracted.

Those few who had sex without appreciation of scent were not looking for sexual satisfaction as much as a monetary pay-off, and if indeed they married without it, their relationship languished until its eventual demise.

In the USA, shaving ourselves clean has diminished our most potent sexual attractant since the scent dissipates off of the skin.

Sexual chemistry is real, as men and women are ultimately controlled by their animal impulses but, unlike other animals, humans can control those urges for a creative sexual expression.





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